The NanoTechnology Group Inc

Free Guide to Open Online courses at Universities


Last year, over 16 million students worldwide enrolled in free open online courses,

enhancing and supplementing their education through public access learning. 

To help students make the most of these opportunities, we've created a timely

 guide to open online courses.


We think students in all communities would benefit from this guide.

  • Curious minds can find interesting and new topics to explore
  • Teachers can access supplemental instructional tools to enhance their curricula
  • Bolster support systems for students seeking English proficiency or core subjects

Again, you can review this resource here: 

http://www.onlinecolleges.net/for-students/open-online-courses-and-moocs/ 


Lisa Bennett | Outreach Associate


lisab@onlinecolleges.net | 202-367-9383

PO Box 52755 | Houston, TX 77052


NanoScience Education for Grades 11-12


Major milestones Omni Nano has achieved in the first half of 2016.


Each and every day, Omni Nano inspires students to pursue STEM careers by bringing them cutting-edge nanotechnology education!


During the first half of 2016, we have:

  • Partnered with UCLA to offer a nanotechnology course through their extension program, starting in the fall 2016 (first day of class: Mon, Sept 19th).
  • Presented more and more of our Discover Nanotechnology workshops, for a total of 145 workshops in 66 different institutions, inspiring over 5,000 students and attendees. Thank you so much to our sponsors for supporting STEM education!

A representative quote from a high school student: “I’m all about helping the world and if nanotechnology can let me do that, then I’m ready.” 

  • Provided the curriculum to pilot several nanotechnology classes. While in beta version, the curriculum was used in a consortium of 22 school districts in Western NY, at the State University of NY, and at Laurel Springs School (the first online school in the US).
  • Participated at exclusive Family Office events:  Spoke at Lido’s Beverly Hills Family Office Directors Association Luncheon Exhibited/spoke at Lido's 11th Annual Family Office Investment Symposium Attended the Global Family Office Symposium
  • Nominated for the Nonprofit Leadership Excellence Award by the Los Angeles Business Journal for the second year in a row.
  • Participated at key events in the nanotech community: National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI)’s  Strategic Planning Stakeholder Workshop (Washington, DC); NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA)’s  15th Annual Conference  (New York City, NY); and Tech Connect’s  World Innovation Conference and Expo (National Harbor, MD).


Omni Nano's mission is to inspire today's youth to become tomorrow's nanotechnology/STEM workforce by providing high-quality, innovative, and interactive educational materials for teaching nanotechnology at the high school level. 


Visit http://www.omninano.org 

"Omni Nano will give every American student the possibility of taking a course in nanotechnology, either in a classroom or online, using a high-quality curriculum."

Dr. Marco Curreli



For information about NISE Net, NanoDays, and how to get involved, please visit:

http://www.nisenet.org/nanodays


For general information about nanoscience, engineering, and technology, please visit:

http://www.whatisnano.org 



        • New Resource for Teachers
        • New Common Core-aligned lesson plan templates, completely free.
        •  
        • You can give them a try at the link below:
        • http://formswift.com/common-core-lesson-plans
        •  
        • With these three lesson plan templates, educators can create and fill out a lesson plan with a professional design for math, science and language arts courses, and download them in PDF or MS Word format with a single click.
        •  


New Video resources for Teachers and Students


Nanowerk has posted 34 videos that will help teachers and students understand nanoscience and the future of the workforce as it enables technologies.  Students in K-12 would be able to understand the size of an atom with this video.  You can also subscribe to TEDEducation for more science videos.


Just How Small is an Atom?

Just how small are atoms? And what's inside them? The answers turn out to be astounding, even for those who think they know. This fast-paced animation uses spectacular metaphors (imagine a blueberry the size of a football stadium!) to give a visceral sense of the building blocks that make our world.

                   

         Category:        General

         Source:        TEDEducation


http://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology/videos/nano_videos.php?page=1&cat=general



K12 Teachers | NSDL.org - National Science Digital Library


NSDL.org is an online science library with links to high quality science, technology, engineering, and math resources for K-12 teachers, faculty ...

nsdl.org/resources_for/k12_teachers


NSDL Science Literacy Maps


NSDL Science Literacy Maps help teachers connect concepts, standards, and NSDL resources.

strandmaps.nsdl.org



UDACITY-Educating the 21st Century


We believe university-level education can be both high quality and low cost. Using the economics of the Internet, we've connected some of the greatest teachers to hundreds of thousands of students in almost every country on Earth. Udacity was founded by three roboticists who believed much of the educational value of their university classes could be offered online for very low cost. A few weeks later, over 160,000 students in more than 190 countries enrolled in our first class, "Introduction to Artificial Intelligence." The class was twice profiled by the New York Times and also by other news media. Now we're a growing team of educators and engineers, on a mission to change the future of education.

http://www.udacity.com/



Welcome to OpenLearn: Free learning from The Open University


By: The OpenLearn team (The Open University)

OpenLearn aims to break the barriers to education by reaching millions of learners around the world, providing free educational resources and inviting all to sample courses that our registered students take – for free!

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/about-openlearn/welcome-openlearn-free-learning-the-open-university


Find the right degree or courses for your needs

Title: www.degrees-courses.com

Description: Degrees & Courses can help you locate the perfect degree program or online course. Get started with your educational research now.



Rice's Connexions to power California colleges'

creation of free textbooks


Connexions' reach and open-copyright formula allows California group to meet federal standard


HOUSTON -- A group of California community colleges and open-education advocates announced a partnership with the Rice University-based open-education platform Connexions and the California-based 20 Million Minds Foundation to enable their new course materials developed with a $20 million federal stimulus grant to be available free online for any educator to use, modify and tailor for their own needs.


The C6 Consortium of Central Valley Community Colleges won the federal grant to create a comprehensive "turnkey" set of course materials for students in allied health and nursing, clean technology and agricultural occupations. The grant -- part of the $500 million Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) Program administered by the Department of Labor and the Department of Education -- specifies that all materials must be created under an open-copyright standard known as the Creative Commons' Attribution license, or CC-BY.


"We have created an streamlined approach to ensure that all materials developed by the C6 Consortium meet the TAACCCT copyright and access requirements," said Dean Florez, president of the California-based 20 Million Minds Foundation. "Our approach makes it faster and easier to develop high-quality CC-BY content for high-enrollment courses, and we're going to share C6's national leading approach with other TAACCCT grantees next week in Washington. A common standard -- particularly one that speeds up the process like this one -- can make us all more effective."


Connexions, founded in 1999, maintains an online repository of more than 20,000 free lessons -- all created under the CC BY license. Connexions' materials are accessed by more than 1 million people per month. The 20 Million Minds Foundation has been an open-source proponent and is set to manage this unique assignment.


"By partnering with Connexions, the C6 Consortium is ensuring that its new courses will have a significant impact both inside and outside of California," said Rice engineering professor Richard Baraniuk, the founder and director of Connexions. "Through Connexions, students in every U.S. state and in more than 200 countries will be able to download free digital versions of the C6 material on any device, in any format, and at any time."


The nonprofit organization 20 Million Minds is dedicated to greatly reducing textbook costs. Headed by Florez, a former California Senate majority leader, the foundation is currently leveraging leading-edge technologies to create more affordable, engaging and effective educational materials for college students throughout the nation.


"The partnership with 20 Million Minds and Connexions puts our colleges, in the C6 Consortium, in the forefront of developing open-source e-textbooks for our students," said Frank Gornick, chancellor of the West Hills Community College District. "It becomes a great tool to develop collaboration among faculty to focus learning on what is needed to develop the pathways for student success and the acquisition of the skills needed for gainful employment."



New Tools for the Classroom


Apple announced a pair of education initiatives that the company hopes will take its iPad to the head of the class. Speaking at a press event at New York's Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Apple executives showed off a new version of the iBooks e-reader app optimized for electronic textbooks as well as a Mac program that can build those textbooks. In addition, Apple is taking its successful iTunes U lecture series and turning it into a mobile app aimed at including course materials beyond just lectures.


Read Macworld's live coverage:


http://www.macworld.com/article/164857/2012/01/live_update_apples_january_19_education_event.html?lsrc=newsalert


Release of an update to iBooks, Apple's e-reader app. Version 2 of iBook adds support for interactive, fullscreen textbooks. Those new-and-improved textbooks are available for download from a new Textbooks section in Apple's iBookstore.


http://www.macworld.com/article/164888/2012/01/apple_releases_ibooks_2_with_support_for_interactive_textbooks.html?lsrc=newsalert 


And how will those textbooks be created for the iPad? With the new iBooks Author tool. The free Mac application draws on Apple's iWork line to make it easy to create electronic textbooks with interactive elements, charts, and other multimedia content.


http://www.macworld.com/article/164889/2012/01/ibooks_author_offers_free_e_textbook_creation.html?lsrc=newsalert


Finally, Apple also released a new iTunes U app, which provides a way for students and teachers to manage course material for classes on an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch. It's a free download from the iOS App Store.


http://www.macworld.com/article/164890/2012/01/apple_unveils_itunes_u_app.html?lsrc=newsalert 



One district’s experience with iPads


Minnesota's Renville County West continues to make the busy transition to iPads in the classroom

From wire service reports at:

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2012/02/06/one-districts-experience-with-ipads/



Apple iBooks 2 license agreement gets

icy reception in higher education


Leaders of the open-license textbook movement heap criticism on restrictiveness

of iBooks 2 publishing platform


By Dennis Carter, Assistant Editor,eCampusnews.com


A blogger who tracks Apple products called the iBooks 2 license agreement 'Apple at its worst.'

Advocates for open-license textbooks in higher education, while largely unhappy with Apple’s new iBooks 2 platform, say the technology behemoth has done a favor for their movement: Apple’s pricey, limiting approach to digital textbooks is in stark contrast to the textbook model that aims for low-cost or free college texts.


iBooks 2, announced to great fanfare during a flashy Jan. 19 press conference in New York City, offers iBooks Author software that enables instructors and others to create and publish their own interactive digital textbooks in the Apple iBooks Bookstore.


Some campus technology leaders hailed the new iBooks platform as a revolution in digital publishing.


Others took a close look at the iBooks 2 licensing agreement’s fine print and called it “crazy evil,” “mind-bogglingly greedy,” and “deliberate sabotage” of the open, industry-leading standard known as EPUB.


Read the full story on eCampus News at:

http://www.ecampusnews.com/higher-ed/apple-ibooks-2-license-agreement-gets-icy-reception-in-higher-education/



Free Textbooks at Flatworld Knowledge


We are the world's largest publisher of free and open college textbooks. With our ever-expanding catalog of top quality books by expert authors, now is your chance to be a hero and help your students save thousands of dollars. Get started today and join the textbook affordability movement.  You don't need the iPad to use these textbooks.

http://flatworldknowledge.com/ 



Feds’ challenge to schools: Embrace digital textbooks


From staff and wire reports

Read more by staff and wire services reports


The Obama administration has challenged schools and companies to get digital textbooks in students' hands within five years.

Are hardbound textbooks going the way of slide rules and typewriters in schools?


Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski on Feb. 1 challenged schools and companies to get digital textbooks in students’ hands within five years. The Obama administration’s push comes two weeks after Apple Inc. announced it would start to sell electronic versions of a few standard high-school books for use on its iPad tablet.


Digital books are viewed as a way to provide interactive learning, potentially save money, and get updated material faster to students.


Digital learning environments have been embraced in Florida, Idaho, Utah, and California, as well as Joplin, Mo., where laptops replaced textbooks destroyed in a tornado. But many schools lack the broadband capacity or the computers or tablets to adopt the technology, and finding the money to go completely digital is difficult for many schools in tough economic times.


Tied to the Feb. 1 announcement at a digital town hall was the government’s release of a 67-page “playbook” to schools that promotes the use of digital textbooks and offers guidance. The administration hopes that dollars spent on traditional textbooks can instead go toward making digital learning more feasible.


Going digital improves the learning process, and it’s being rolled out at a faster pace in other countries such as South Korea, Genachowski said in an interview. Genachowski said he’s hopeful it can be cost-effective in the long run, especially as the price of digital tablets drops.


http://www.eschoolnews.com/2012/02/01/feds-challenge-to-schools-embrace-digital-textbooks/?utm_source=website&utm_medium=url&utm_campaign=slider



OpenStax College plans free textbooks for popular college courses


Heavyweight nonprofits back free textbook initiative led by Rice University's Connexions


VIDEO is available at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40ETbLVkLKc 


HOUSTON -- (Feb. 7, 2012) -- The Rice University-based open-education platform Connexions today unveiled a bold plan to shake up the $4 billion college textbook industry by providing free online publisher-quality textbooks for five of the country's most-attended college courses.


The OpenStax College textbook initiative, which is funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the 20 Million Minds Foundation and the Maxfield Foundation, will publish its first two books -- College Physics and Introduction to Sociology -- in March. Three more books are in production and slated to go online this fall.


"If we capture just 10 percent of the market with these first five textbooks, an estimated 1 million college students in the United States could save $90 million over the next five years," said Rice's Richard Baraniuk, the founder and director of Connexions.


"We are investing the resources necessary to create professional-quality textbooks," said former publishing executive David Harris, the editor in chief of OpenStax College. "In terms of quality, our free books will be competitive with texts that currently retail for $150 or more. Furthermore, because our content is openly licensed, faculty will be able to easily modify and adapt OpenStax College content to meet specific course needs."


OpenStax College is a nonprofit, but Harris said the organization is forging partnerships with for-profit companies that will provide homework, testing, tutoring and other services that college students need.


"OpenStax College believes the future of education lies in greater access for more students, and free high-quality books are a key to that," Baraniuk said. "By lowering the barriers for students, we're creating new business opportunities for the market. In particular, we’re developing a self-sustaining ecosystem of companies that will provide services around our content."


Harris said OpenStax College will announce its first partnerships Feb. 15 at Connexions' annual conference at Rice.


OpenStax College is powered by Connexions, a Rice University-based open-education platform launched in 1999 that draws more than 1 million visitors per month. Connexions allows anyone to publish, modify and use free, high-quality online educational texts.


OpenStax College books will be available for free online via computers, tablets and smartphones. Connexion's print-on-demand feature will make it possible for students to order low-cost print copies. Baraniuk said a full-color edition of its 600-page introductory sociology textbook will sell for about $30.


OpenStax College's physics and sociology texts will be online by early March, in time for colleges and community colleges to make fall textbook decisions.


Two biology textbooks – one for majors and one for nonmajors – and a textbook for introductory anatomy and physiology will be published this fall.


"Open textbooks have the potential to save students millions of dollars," said Hewlett Foundation Program Director for Education Barbara Chow. "By focusing on the highest-volume college courses first, OpenStax College will have the broadest possible impact, and it will reach a large and diverse set of students."





This video was made for K-3


Currently 64 videos for students at:

http://www.youtube.com/user/NIBIBTV/videos


A Green Light for Biology -- Making the Invisible Visible

This video is appropriate for middle school and high school

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sl2PRHGpYuU&feature=endscreen&NR=1



Skills Advantage Inc - Resources For Educators


Skills Advantage, Inc™ is a test publisher and e-learning solutions provider for end-user certifications. Our core products and services provide e-assessment and training to the largest global ‘digital literacy’ certification program: ICDL Certification.


Our technology solutions and professional support services have been deployed into education, government and corporate markets around the world. As a technology provider we develop and license our leading-edge solutions to both professional assessment companies and awarding bodies supporting multiple languages and authoring tools which allow localized and specific contextual content.


Specialties

e-Assessment, IT Simulators, Digital Literacy Training and Assessment, Authoring Tools for E-learning.

For More Information visit our Website:

http://www.skillsadv.com 



The Big Deal Book - Amazing Resources for Educators


Our mission is to save every educator time and money while identifying top-quality resources for schools and classrooms. Big Deal Books are print and electronic publications that offer invaluable resources for educators, while serving specific audiences including K-12 technology professionals and educators of English language learners (ELL).


In each edition, educators find content-rich sources of grants and other attainable funding for their special programs and plans, rich resources for 21st century skills, professional development training opportunities, free and inexpensive finds including standards-based lessons, inexpensive materials and help with research and assessment.


We seek to serve ed tech professionals, media specialists, curriculum directors, tech-savvy teachers and ELL program professionals as they aspire to teaching and learning excellence.


http://www.bigdealbook.com 



Nano Science Instruments New Tools for Classrooms

 


We're pleased to introduce a new, lower-cost scanning tunneling microscope, the Nanosurf NaioSTM. The easy-to-use NaioSTM enables you and your students to image at the atomic and molecular scale, investigate electronic properties of novel surfaces, visualize self assembly, and create your own nanoscale experiments!


Features:


  • Reduced size: Scan platform & controller now integrated
  • Lower price than the easyScan 2 STM
  • Same ease of use
  • Cool Experiments
  • See carbon atoms in graphene and graphite!
  • Study self-assembled monolayers
  • Look at local density of states
  • Study semiconductor band gaps

Call us toll free at 888-777-5573 for pricing, availability, and examples of educational material that you can use in your lab, or visit our website at:

www.nanoscience.com



The Phenom Desktop Scanning Electron Microscope

The Phenom G2 series SEMs are idea for both teaching and industrial applications.  Their very fast load times, touch screen interface, and neverlost navigation keeps students engaged in the process of seeing at the nano and microscale.


All Phenom systems provide:


  • Fastest load times:  30 seconds from load to image
  • Neverlost Navigation:  video camera shows your location on your sample
  • Easiest to use SEM:  intuitive controls and interface
  • Touchscreen interface:  zoom, focus, & move with a touch of a finger

http://www.nanoscience.com/products/Desktop_SEM/index.html


Visit the NanoScience Classroom at:

http://www.nanoscience.com


Download Newsletter at http://www.nanoscience.com/education/newsletter/index.html



Become a NanoScienceWorks.org Member

NanoScienceWorks.org is one of the web's leading information exchange portals for connecting with the latest science news, leading experts and award-winning institutions in nanoscience research community.


Membership in NanoScienceWorks.org is free, and includes access to an unparalleled collection of nanoscience research, information and thought-leaders. NanoScienceWorks.org members receive valuable offers and access to exclusive book excerpts, videos, download and discounts across a wide range of more than 20 disciplines in nanoscience research, manufacturing and commercialization. Connect with the world's top nano researchers and institutions for biology, chemistry, CNTs, electronics, fluidics, medicine, MEMS & NEMS, quantum dots, tribology and more.


http://nanoscienceworks.org/nsw_join_form



BIOMIMICRY FUNDAMENTALS FOR ALL AGES


Introducing nanoscale science through biomimicry

Curricula and links to resources that are fundamental to understanding biomimicry and why it is important. You can use these resources with any age group, with slight modifications. Often, using these resources as part of a learning progression -- a conscious sequence of activities that occurs over time, such as over a year or woven across several years of K-12 curricula. 


Teachers can also introduce nanoscale science with biomimicry curricula as atoms are the underlying foundation of nature.  Since everything in nature begins at the nanoscale and our bodies have billions of atoms holding us together in the state of matter, nature becomes our teacher. Biomimicry also integrates biology, physics and chemistry in nature. 


Introducing activities to pre-school children also prepares them to become early observers of nature when they are most curious and receptive to information stimulating a desire to learn science in depth as their curiosity matures.


Nature observation activities

Biomimicry is a new way to view and value the natural world, so building Nature observation sensibilities in your students is a fundamental building block for them.


   - Joseph Cornell's book, Sharing Nature with Children, is a classic with many, many great Nature observation activities, and one of the very best of the many books, therefore highly recommended.


Interactive ways of exploring the concept of function in biology and technology


"Function" is a fundamental concept in biomimicry -- this concept more than any other is what allows people to use biomimicry as an innovation methodology. Here are two fun activities that help students look at the natural world in terms of how it functions, and to make the connection between biological function and technological application.


   - "Seeing" function (PDF/1.29M)


   - Function junction (PDF/625KB)


We are not alone

Humans often feel, and are even taught to feel, that we are a categorically different species than the rest of Nature. For years, young children were taught that humans were the only species that used tools, for example (an idea shattered first by Jane Goodall's observation of chimpanzees fishing for termites using sticks). One of biomimicry's most important implications is that Nature's technological solutions address humanity's technological challenges. In other words, that humanity is not alone. Instead, what we are surrounded by is a wealth of ideas for solving our own technological challenges. This activity conveys this important idea.


   - We Are Not Alone (PDF/940KB)


Visit the Institute and sign up for the free curriculum.


 http://www.biomimicryinstitute.org


Kathy Zarsky’s interest in teaching biomimicry to kids began a year and a half ago with her sons Stanis and Gustavo.


She trained with our Biomimicry Affiliate Universidad Iberoamaricano in 2009 and as a Biomimicry Specialist in 2011 so that she could integrate the discipline into her work as a systems designer and sustainability strategist.


And she did.


In fact, she founded BiomimicryTX, one of 13 regional biomimicry networks supported by the Institute. And this past October, she convened two biomimicry panels at the popular South by Southwest Eco Conference in Austin, Texas.


But as her own understanding of biomimicry grew, so also did her sense of responsibility to share that knowledge with children.


She began by teaching her boys how to look closely at nature: to see how tree bark bifurcates as it bends, or sheds, or changes color as it matures.


Today, between her busy schedule as a mom and business owner, she volunteers after school to teach biomimicry and biophilia to middle school girls. She is developing biomimicry youth camp programs, and in January will work with BiomimicryTX to support local schools that participate in our Biomimicry Youth Challenge.


Kathy and the BiomimicryTX network have more plans for bringing biomimicry to schools and businesses across Texas. Your tax-deductible donation will help us support their efforts, along with those of the other biomimicry network leaders around the globe.


Biomimicry|TX (BiomimicryTX) on Twitter

Biomimicry|TX @BiomimicryTX. A network for companies, research, universities, NGO’s to learn from each other, create synergies, be ...

twitter.com/BiomimicryTX


Learn more about the education networks at:

Regional Networks :: Biomimicry 3.8

The global biomimicry community is growing and self-organizing through the creation of regional networks. Biomimicry 3.8 is nourishing and learning from these ...

biomimicry.net/connecting/regional-networks 


Biomimicry | Network

A biomimicry network where you can learn from each other, create synergies, be inspired and stimulate the development of biomimicry entrepreneurships

www.biomimicrynl.org/en/network.html


Bay Area Biomimicry Network

Are you looking for opportunities to deepen your training and skills in biomimicry? Consider apply for the next international cohort of Biomimicry Specialists!

www.bayareabiomimicry.org



Take Your Science Curriculum and Your Students to the Next Level with the State-of-the-Art, Hands-On NanoProfessor Nanoscience Education Program


NanoProfessor is an exciting and comprehensive Nanoscience Education Program combining cutting-edge desktop nanofabrication instruments with a stimulating curriculum.  Students will be immersed into the rapidly growing

field of nanotechnology through real hands-on experience in building custom- engineered nanoscale structures. With an incredible range of new applications from building solar cells to fighting cancer cells, nanotechnology is the future of science and engineering education.


http://www.nanoprofessor.net/ 


NANO in my Life Modules - 4 modules: Nature, Health, ICT, Environment experiments


Nature: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fhthxn3wGaE&feature=BFa&list=SP55E60D871E3B59E9

Health:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UawZX_gqWcI&feature=BFa&list=SP55E60D871E3B59E9

ICT:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PVVM6_iPlk&feature=BFa&list=SP55E60D871E3B59E9

Environment:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihHL6H3imHI&feature=BFa&list=SP55E60D871E3B59E9



New Video resources for Teachers and Students


Nanowerk has posted 34 videos that will help teachers and students understand nanoscience and the future of the workforce as it enables technologies.  Students in K-12 would be able to understand the size of an atom with this video.  You can also subscribe to TEDEducation for more science videos.


Just How Small is an Atom?

Just how small are atoms? And what's inside them? The answers turn out to be astounding, even for those who think they know. This fast-paced animation uses spectacular metaphors (imagine a blueberry the size of a football stadium!) to give a visceral sense of the building blocks that make our world.

                   

         Category:        General

         Source:        TEDEducation


http://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology/videos/nano_videos.php?page=1&cat=general



K12 Teachers | NSDL.org - National Science Digital Library


NSDL.org is an online science library with links to high quality science, technology, engineering, and math resources for K-12 teachers, faculty ...

nsdl.org/resources_for/k12_teachers


NSDL Science Literacy Maps


NSDL Science Literacy Maps help teachers connect concepts, standards, and NSDL resources.

strandmaps.nsdl.org 



Welcome to OpenLearn: Free learning from The Open University


By: The OpenLearn team (The Open University)

OpenLearn aims to break the barriers to education by reaching millions of learners around the world, providing free educational resources and inviting all to sample courses that our registered students take – for free!


http://www.open.edu/openlearn/about-openlearn/welcome-openlearn-free-learning-the-open-university



Free Textbooks at Flatworld Knowledge


We are the world's largest publisher of free and open college textbooks. With our ever-expanding catalog of top quality books by expert authors, now is your chance to be a hero and help your students save thousands of dollars. Get started today and join the textbook affordability movement.  You don't need the iPad to use these textbooks.

http://flatworldknowledge.com/ 



Feds’ challenge to schools: Embrace digital textbooks


From staff and wire reports

Read more by staff and wire services reports


The Obama administration has challenged schools and companies to get digital textbooks in students' hands within five years.

Are hardbound textbooks going the way of slide rules and typewriters in schools?


Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski on Feb. 1 challenged schools and companies to get digital textbooks in students’ hands within five years. The Obama administration’s push comes two weeks after Apple Inc. announced it would start to sell electronic versions of a few standard high-school books for use on its iPad tablet.


Digital books are viewed as a way to provide interactive learning, potentially save money, and get updated material faster to students.


Digital learning environments have been embraced in Florida, Idaho, Utah, and California, as well as Joplin, Mo., where laptops replaced textbooks destroyed in a tornado. But many schools lack the broadband capacity or the computers or tablets to adopt the technology, and finding the money to go completely digital is difficult for many schools in tough economic times.


Tied to the Feb. 1 announcement at a digital town hall was the government’s release of a 67-page “playbook” to schools that promotes the use of digital textbooks and offers guidance. The administration hopes that dollars spent on traditional textbooks can instead go toward making digital learning more feasible.


Going digital improves the learning process, and it’s being rolled out at a faster pace in other countries such as South Korea, Genachowski said in an interview. Genachowski said he’s hopeful it can be cost-effective in the long run, especially as the price of digital tablets drops.


http://www.eschoolnews.com/2012/02/01/feds-challenge-to-schools-embrace-digital-textbooks/?utm_source=website&utm_medium=url&utm_campaign=slider 






OpenStax College plans free textbooks for popular college courses


Heavyweight nonprofits back free textbook initiative led by Rice University's Connexions


VIDEO is available at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40ETbLVkLKc 


HOUSTON -- (Feb. 7, 2012) -- The Rice University-based open-education platform Connexions today unveiled a bold plan to shake up the $4 billion college textbook industry by providing free online publisher-quality textbooks for five of the country's most-attended college courses.


The OpenStax College textbook initiative, which is funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the 20 Million Minds Foundation and the Maxfield Foundation, will publish its first two books -- College Physics and Introduction to Sociology -- in March. Three more books are in production and slated to go online this fall.


"If we capture just 10 percent of the market with these first five textbooks, an estimated 1 million college students in the United States could save $90 million over the next five years," said Rice's Richard Baraniuk, the founder and director of Connexions.


"We are investing the resources necessary to create professional-quality textbooks," said former publishing executive David Harris, the editor in chief of OpenStax College. "In terms of quality, our free books will be competitive with texts that currently retail for $150 or more. Furthermore, because our content is openly licensed, faculty will be able to easily modify and adapt OpenStax College content to meet specific course needs."


OpenStax College is a nonprofit, but Harris said the organization is forging partnerships with for-profit companies that will provide homework, testing, tutoring and other services that college students need.


"OpenStax College believes the future of education lies in greater access for more students, and free high-quality books are a key to that," Baraniuk said. "By lowering the barriers for students, we're creating new business opportunities for the market. In particular, we’re developing a self-sustaining ecosystem of companies that will provide services around our content."


Harris said OpenStax College will announce its first partnerships Feb. 15 at Connexions' annual conference at Rice.


OpenStax College is powered by Connexions, a Rice University-based open-education platform launched in 1999 that draws more than 1 million visitors per month. Connexions allows anyone to publish, modify and use free, high-quality online educational texts.


OpenStax College books will be available for free online via computers, tablets and smartphones. Connexion's print-on-demand feature will make it possible for students to order low-cost print copies. Baraniuk said a full-color edition of its 600-page introductory sociology textbook will sell for about $30.


OpenStax College's physics and sociology texts will be online by early March, in time for colleges and community colleges to make fall textbook decisions.


Two biology textbooks – one for majors and one for nonmajors – and a textbook for introductory anatomy and physiology will be published this fall.


"Open textbooks have the potential to save students millions of dollars," said Hewlett Foundation Program Director for Education Barbara Chow. "By focusing on the highest-volume college courses first, OpenStax College will have the broadest possible impact, and it will reach a large and diverse set of students."




Diana G. Oblinger, Editor

©2012 EDUCAUSE ISBN 978-1-933046-00-6


How can we reach more learners, more effectively,

and with greater impact?


Education changes lives and societies, but can we sustain the current model? New models and new technologies allow us to rethink many of the premises of education—location and time, credits and credentials, knowledge creation and sharing.


Game Changers: Education and Information Technologies is a collection of chapters and case studies contributed by college and university presidents, provosts, faculty, and other stakeholders. Institutions are finding new ways of achieving higher education’s mission without being crippled by constraints or overpowered by greater expectations.


Find out who is changing the game and what we can learn from their different approaches in Game Changers. Download the entire book or individual chapters and case studies below.


http://www.educause.edu/research-publications/books/game-changers-education-and-information-technologies


http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/pub7203.pdf 



Solutions for Education:


A Teacher's Resource: HeartMath Institute...Connecting Hearts and Minds


The Science Behind the HeartMath System (Free ebook for subscribers)


This insightful comprehensive monograph provides fundamental and detailed summaries of the Institute of HeartMath’s years of innovative research. It provides a brief overview of heart rate variability, entrainment, coherence, head-heart interactions, the scientific discoveries that shaped the tools and techniques developed to empower heart-based living. It provides summary reports of the research conducted in a variety of fields, such as business, education, health and music. Charts, diagrams and full explanations are presented in a form that is both easy for the layperson and complete for the science professional.


Sign up as a subscriber to download this free e-book: http://www.heartmath.org/


Also check out the Education Section for Classroom Programs, resources, research on test/learn perfomances. Find out how the programs can help your students who have testing anxiety.


http://www.heartmath.org/education/education-home/education-applications.html



It’s Tablet Time: K-12 Students Find Learning Advantages


Tablet computers appear to be having a transformative impact on K-12 classrooms across all grade levels. They certainly offer the promise of empowering students to achieve more and learn with ever-increasing enthusiasm.


It’s important to distinguish between the types of tablets in the market. There are “slate” tablets—like the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet or the Apple iPad—and “convertible tablets” such as the ThinkPad X220t, which provide a combination of laptop and tablet features. In this post, I’m going to be focused on slate tablets.


Tablets have dynamic touch screens and, in some cases, digital pens. Slates in particular offer longer battery life than most PCs, they boot up faster and users enjoy an ever-growing number of applications. Most importantly, they provide extreme mobility. Their small size enables students to move between learning spaces without difficulty—whether those spaces are in school, at home or elsewhere.


Read entire article and download white paper at:

http://www.k12educationtechnology.com/2012/05/30/tablet-time-12-students-find-learning-advantages/?elq_mid=1801&elq_cid=674067



Education News

A Global Leading News Source covering educational, political, business, and environmental issues. Since 1997 EducationNews has provided the latest daily EducationNews coverage from world-wide sources. In addition to the U. S. and world media publications, commentaries and reports are featured and include comprehensive views on education issues from all sides of the political spectrum. EducationNews.org has been ranked Number 1 for many years in our coverage of education. EducationNews.org is a fresh approach to the age-old problem of increasing coverage of education news. Unfortunately, education is not a topic that news organizations are able to provide premium coverage to all the time, thus ironically, all education experts face the same problem – the difficulty of educating the public.


http://www.educationnews.org/education-policy-and-politics/ 



IEEE Signal Processing Society offers free educational

content via Connexions


Partnership assures quality of open-access educational materials


HOUSTON -- (Dec. 1, 2010) -- Rice University's Connexions and the IEEE Signal Processing Society (IEEE-SPS) today announced the release of a broad collection of free, high-quality lessons that practicing engineers can use for their own education and career growth and that engineering instructors can mix and match to build customized courses, textbooks and study guides. The free material, all of it peer-reviewed to ensure high quality, is available online via the popular education site Connexions (cnx.org), which attracts more than 2 million visits per month.


A novel aspect of the collaboration is the rigorous peer review of the quality of the materials by experts identified by the IEEE-SPS. Materials found to be of high quality are certified and collected in the IEEE-SPS "lens," which is available at http://cnx.org/lenses/ieeesps/endorsements.


"Connexions' lenses adapt the time-tested peer-review process to open-access educational content, thus erasing a major concern for academic authors," said Joel Thierstein, executive director of Connexions.


While the open-education movement has grown rapidly in recent years, critics have questioned how open-access publishers can ensure the quality of freely authored and edited materials. An oft-proposed option is adapting peer review -- the process academic researchers have used for centuries to vet and certify research papers and books.


Founded more than a decade ago, Connexions is among the world's most popular open- education sites. Connexions' repository of free educational content can be employed, adapted and modified by anyone. The number of people using Connexions has grown exponentially in recent years.


"All materials must pass thorough a rigorous quality evaluation before they appear on the IEEE Signal Processing Society's branded portal in Connexions," said Roxana Saint-Nom, chair of the society's Connexions Lens Subcommittee.


"While quality assurance of content was a key issue for us, Connexions offers other tangible benefits for our members," said SPS President Mos Kaveh. "Compared with traditional publishing, Connexions is much faster, has global reach and is perfectly suited for the rapid pace of change in our field."


In Connexions, anyone can create modules or "learning objects." Like Lego blocks, these modules can be assembled and reassembled by users to create an almost endless variety of customized Web courses, textbooks, study guides and curricula.


While Connexions welcomes contributions from anyone, anywhere, it also features filtering layers called lenses. These lenses are what IEEE-SPS and other groups use to certify content. While Connexions supplies the tools, each organization develops its own processes for certifying contributed materials. In the case of the IEEE-SPS, the society developed a lens with social software features like a keyword tag cloud, discussion areas and tools that allow authors to track the worldwide impact of their contributions. The society's lens can also single out exemplary signal processing-related content.


"Lenses are a key feature that differentiates Connexions from other open-education projects," said Rice engineering professor and Connexions founder Richard Baraniuk, an IEEE-SPS member. "We're glad to see the IEEE Signal Processing Society taking leadership both in establishing peer review for the open-access environment and in encouraging their members to contribute open-access materials to Connexions."


IEEE, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., is the world's largest technical professional organization; it has more than 350,000 members worldwide. The IEEE-SPS represents the technical interests of its more than 15,000 members in 148 countries. It is widely known as a publisher of archival journals and sponsor of major conferences across the broad landscape of signal processing science and technology.




Focus on Digital


EDC staff have been delving into the digital realm to learn how new technologies can help teachers teach and students learn science. Below we feature some of our exciting work.


Electronic Teacher Guide


EDC’s Jackie Miller and Bill Tally are PI and co-PI respectively on a five-year National Science Foundation-funded project that will bring one of our outstanding science curriculum products into the digital age. They are developing a prototype of an electronic Teacher Guide (eTG) for an existing 12-week high school genetics unit within EDC’s Foundation Science: Biology. This web-based, interactive guide will leverage features of digital media to support the needs of a range of teachers by customizing the content delivered and providing different interfaces and layers for pedagogical supports. As envisioned, the eTG will provide just-in-time access to rich media resources relating to the content and pedagogy of the curriculum and include additional functionalities that help teachers plan lessons, manage materials, and assess student learning.

The premise of the eTG project is that easier access to features that support teacher understanding will result in teachers taking greater advantage of all the resources available to them. In a series of classroom-based studies, the team will conduct research to determine how the use of the eTG impacts teacher learning and practice, particularly in relation to the fidelity with which teachers modify and adapt instructional materials at the secondary level.

For more information about this project, contact Jackie Miller at jsmiller@edc.org

top


Universal Design for Learning (UDL)


Science educators at all grade levels face a daunting challenge: raise the academic performance in all the sciences of an increasingly diverse student population. Despite raised expectations and increased access for students with disabilities within the general curriculum, students with disabilities lag significantly behind their peers in science learning.

EDC’s Jackie Miller and June Foster are tackling this problem head on by creating new kinds of science materials, ones that embody both the principles and practices of high-quality science and universal design for learning (UDL). The project team, which includes staff from CAST (Wakefield, Mass.) and the University of Michigan  designed a Web-based UDL Inquiry Science software system that enables authors to digitally customize science curricula to incorporate UDL features such as highlighting critical text; categorizing and organizing notes from reading, experiments, and discussions; and multimedia coaches that provide models of successful practice. Through use of these embedded supports, the team predicts that students with learning disabilities will be more likely to reach their full academic potential in science.

The project used the software system to customize a biology unit from EDC’s Foundation Science curriculum. In September, the research team began pilot testing this digital curriculum in two ecology classes at Newton North High School (Newton, Mass.) to get a firsthand look at what UDL-enhanced learning looks like in the classroom. They are particularly interested in the enhanced learning opportunities that the UDL software affords all students, both those without and with learning disabilities.

For more information on this project, contact June Foster at jfoster@edc.org 

top


Possible Worlds


Possible Worlds is an adventure-based game designed for the handheld Nintendo Dual Screen device, targeting middle-grades science students. The expectation is that students’ experiences with the game, along with teacher-directed instruction and classroom discussion, will give students concrete and experience-based visualizations of typically difficult and abstract science concepts. The game, developed by staff at EDC’s Center for Children in Technology and EDC science specialists Marian Pasquale and Martha Davis, has been featured as a highlight of IES-funded projects in the September issue of the IES newsletter

For more information on this project, contact Marian Pasquale at mpasquale@edc.org 

top


Exploring the Frontiers of Science with Online Telescopes: Other Worlds


EDC’s Ruth Krumhansl is working with the Science Education Department at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics on the Other Worlds project, which engages students in the search for planets orbiting other stars. The project website provides students with access to a telescope and a suite of tools that they use to process images and take measurements. Using online graphing and data-sharing tools, students analyze their measurements and detect actual planetary eclipses of distant stars. In the second part of the project, students work with a suite of interactive computer models to explore what scientists might be able to learn in the future, when they are able to detect the light coming directly from a planet. Using the models, students analyze a set of signals from a mystery world and develop hypotheses about the planet’s surface and atmosphere. They create an animated portrait of their mystery world and consider whether it could support life.

The Other Worlds project was successfully piloted during the 2009–2010 school year in a variety of classrooms around the country, ranging from 7th grade earth science to AP physics. Field testing is currently underway.

For more information, contact Ruth Krumhansl and rkrumhansl@edc.org 

top

 

Success at the Core


Success at the Core (SaC) is a research-based, successfully piloted, video-driven, Web-based, and free suite of professional development materials. With an innovative platform and flexible design that lets educators adapt materials to align with school priorities and needs, SaC builds both instruction and leadership capacity in order to improve student performance.

SaC consists of two major components: Leadership Development modules and Teacher Development strategies. Seven Leadership Development modules feature documentary-style videos of effective school leadership in action, readings and group activities. The 24 Teacher Development strategies feature effective classroom practices. Each strategy illustrates and informs solid classroom teaching with video footage of classroom practice and teacher reflection on practice, lesson plan, student artifacts, and activities. One-third of the 24 teacher development videos showcase effective practices in middle school science classrooms. Examples include Analyzing Data in Small Groups, Grounding Content, and Exploring Predictions.

EDC’s Barbara Miller and team collaborated with Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen and his Vulcan Productions team to develop SaC. SaC was successfully piloted in 11 Washington State middle schools in 2009-10, and publicly launched in Washington State in July 2010. It is available free to anyone who registers at the website.

In three months, SaC has had over 7,300 visits and over 1,700 registrants from across the country. The SaC team encourages our EDC colleagues and friends to register at www.successatthecore.com and utilize the free resource.

top


Just Launched: Exploring Trees and Ponds: Informal Life Science Activities for Youth


EDC’s Bernie Zubrowski has just launched a new website called Exploring Trees and Ponds: Informal Life Science Activities for Youth. All of the activity materials on the site, available to out-of-school centers, activity leaders, and parents, are free of charge. The activities comprise extended investigations of living phenomena and were developed for youth ages 10-14. The three-year project that developed this website, Enhancing Informal Explorations of Living Phenomena Through Digital Images, involves both the development of the activities and controlled applied research, studying the role of different modes of visual representations as well as the impact of the activities themselves on participant youths’ attitudes toward learning about living phenomena and in preparing them for further learning in the sciences. Boston Nature Center, and University of New Hampshire 4-H have collaborated on this project.

Please visit the site at http://treesandponds.edc.org 

For more information on this project, contact Bernie Zubrowski at bzubrowski@edc.org

top


Just Launched: NPASS2 Website

Taking the National Partnerships for AfterSchool Science to Scale (NPASS2) is a professional development program led by EDC’s Charlie Hutchison. This three-year NSF Informal Science Education (ISE) project has just launched a new website to support the mission of NPASS2. The NPASS2 program is training and supporting a cadre of new science trainers in eight partnering states to promote and support high-quality science (STEM) project work at out-of-school time (OST) agencies in their states.


This site, intended not only for NPASS2 science trainers, but for all who are interested in OST programs, contains continuously expanding information and resources aimed at improving the quality and quantity of hands-on science available to children in these programs. Among the resources are materials lists, video clips, and other helpful information on Design It! and Explore It!, the research-based curriculum series that are used by the science trainers.


Please visit the site at http://npass2.edc.org/


For more information on this project, contact Charlie Hutchison at chutchison@edc.org 

top


Recently Awarded


EDC is pleased to announce our latest funding awards to improve science teaching and learning.

 

Community College Pathways to STEM Education and Occupations for Women


Lois Joy, EDC senior research associate is the recipient of this NSF Gender in Science and Engineering grant, which will research community college pathways to STEM education and occupations for women. The research goals of the project are to identify the individual and institutional factors that contribute to women’s successful recruitment, progress, and completion of community college STEM degrees and certificates. Key questions we explore include (1) What are the characteristics of men and women who study STEM in community colleges? (2) What factors contribute to the successful completion of community college STEM degrees? (3) Do more men or more women transfer to four-year STEM programs or STEM occupations? (4) Do programs that recruit and support STEM students serve women as well as they serve men? For our analysis, we will use the nationally representative and longitudinal National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) Beginning Post-Secondary Surveys (BPS) and case studies of four STEM community college programs at Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester and Springfield Technical Community College.

While the quantitative research identifies the factors that contribute to progress through community college STEM and the differences for men and women, the qualitative analysis will tell us why these gender differences persist. By delineating what is working and what is lacking in community college systems of support for women in STEM as well as the factors that predict STEM community college progress, our research will enable educators and administrators to best allocate scarce resources for program, practice, and policy development.

For more information on this project, contact Lois Joy at ljoy@edc.org

top


Data-enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICE)


EDC is working with SRI International and NASA in the development and piloting of two interactive websites for high school classroom climate change investigations. These websites will allow high school teachers to assemble customized data sets about local climate change from NASA remotely-sensed Earth observation mission data archived in NASA’s Goddard Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure (Giovanni). The project involves adapting Giovanni data sets created for use by scientists to specifically gear them to the capacities of high school students and teachers. Four of the six pilot teachers participating in this project are currently implementing EDC’s Foundation Science: Earth Science (FSES) climate curriculum in their classrooms. EDC will revise the FSES climate unit to incorporate use of the NASA Giovanni data, and will work with the pilot teachers as the project websites are developed and tested.

For more information, contact Ruth Krumhansl at rkrumhansl@edc.org 

top


Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements


The National Science Foundation has recently funded Moreno/Lyons Productions Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements project to develop a two-hour film about the human story behind the periodic table of elements. Search for the Elements will tell a riveting detective story stretching from the ancient alchemists, whose misguided attempts to turn lead into gold predated the realization that matter comes in the unchanging forms we call elements, to today’s search for the elusive Island of Stability, where stable new forms of matter may await discovery.

Moreno/Lyons Productions has commissioned EDC to develop a Teacher’s Edition of the television program and a guide with supplementary materials to help high school chemistry teachers couple their presentation of science concepts with the stories of the men and women who discovered them. EDC staff will create a Teacher’s Edition of the Search for the Elements program, broken into shorter chapters, and with stop-and-think and Web icons. The guide will provide companion pieces such as an index and searchable transcript of the program, a glossary of chemical terms, alignments of the program to national science education standards and textbooks, suggestions for student reflection on chapters of the program, and investigations related to the program.

For more information, contact Christine Brown at cvbrown@edc.org 

top


Oceans of Data


EDC has recently been awarded a collaborative research grant (NSF, DRK-12) to work with Scripps Institution of Oceanography to conduct the Oceans of Data project. The question to be addressed is: In what ways can research inform the design of electronic interfaces and technology tools that will allow students to use and make meaning of large, Internet-based scientific databases? PI June Foster, co-PI Ruth Krumhansl, and senior associate Irene Baker will conduct a cross-disciplinary literature review of potentially relevant literature in fields such as science education, statistics education, visual analytics, and augmented cognition. The goal is to develop design recommendations and recommendations for further research, in service of effectively extending science cyberinfrastructures to the high school classrooms. Scripps will apply the design recommendations to the development of the newly-funded NSF Ocean Observatory Initiative.

For more information on this project, contact June Foster at jfoster@edc.org

top


Notable


STEM Study Referenced in PCAST Report


The President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology's (PCAST) long-awaited report on STEM education was published on September 15. The report’s recommendations suggest an agenda for the federal agencies that fund STEM education and will have impact not only on funding initiatives but also in policies related to standards, technology in the classroom, compensation and recruitment of STEM teachers, new STEM-focused schools, as well as STEM leadership and coordination of federal agencies with STEM programs. Note that the study on science specialists cited on page 102 was authored by EDC’s Abigail Levy, Marian Pasquale, and Lisa Marco.

top

This newsletter gives a comprehensive look at science activities within EDC’s Learning and Teaching Division. It previously was known as the CSE (Center for Science Education) News Alert.

To view past news, visit the main News section of the Science website at http://cse.edc.org/news/ 



Connexions content now available as e-books


Connexions content available in EPUB format; can be used on most e-readers


HOUSTON -- (Sept. 10, 2010) -- All content from Rice University's open education initiative Connexions is now available for download as e-books. Connexions rolled out the availability of more than 1,000 titles this week in the popular EPUB file format. EPUB is the standard used by most smart phones and e-readers worldwide. The files can be accessed with enTourage’s eDGe, Apple's iPad and iPhone and with Google's Android, among others.


"More and more students are accessing educational materials on phones and e-readers," said Joel Thierstein, executive director of Connexions. "The mobile device is, in many cases, the primary access point for educational content in the developing world."


Detailed instructions for downloading e-books from Connexions are available at:

http://cnx.org/help/viewing/epub-help


Connexions is a leading global provider of free, open educational materials. With more about 1.5 million visits per month, its repository is also one of the world's most-used open education resources. The repository contains nearly 17,000 educational modules, which are grouped into more than 1,000 collections. Many of Connexions' collections were compiled by university faculty and are already used as textbooks, either by students who access them online or print them at low cost.


Connexions is available free for anyone to contribute to or learn from at http://cnx.org



Solving the STEM Education Crisis


As technology becomes an integral part of the workplace, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) skills are no longer just “good skills” to have; they are increasingly important to a 21st-century education.


But training students for success in the STEM disciplines also is necessary if the U.S. is to remain globally competitive. Recent results from the Program for International Student Assessment suggested the top-performing U.S. high school students were bested by students from at least 20 other nations in math and science.


Attracting students to the STEM disciplines is the first hurdle, and retaining student interest in these areas is the second. Solving the STEM education crisis won’t be easy—but with the generous support of Learning.com, we’ve compiled this collection of stories from our archives, along with other resources from around the web, to help you answer this challenge in your own schools.


Visit the Education Resource Center (ERC) at:

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2009/12/13/igniting-and-sustaining-stem-education-2/



NANOINK LAUNCHES NEW WEB SITE

 

CHICAGO, Ill. – August 31, 2010 – NanoInk, Inc.®, a global leader in nanotechnology, announced today that it launched a new corporate Web site, www.nanoink.net, which includes the latest information on its five operating divisions: NanoFabrication Systems; Nano BioDiscovery; NanoGuardian™; NanoProfessor™; and NanoStem™ Cell. The new Web site clearly delineates between the different divisions and commercial applications, so that visitors can more easily find the information they need. The Web site also contains updated product information, the very latest application notes and proof of performance data.


”Over the last several years, NanoInk has grown to incorporate five distinct operating divisions,“ said James Hussey, chief executive officer for NanoInk. ”Our new Web site reflects the transition from a technology company to a provider of commercial applications including core desktop Nanolithography instrumentation, anti-counterfeiting for the pharmaceutical industry and nanotechnology curriculum and education.“


NanoInk’s divisions include:

• The NanoFabrication Systems Division provides core desktop instrumentation and application expertise for current and future applications of DPN®. More information is available at: http://nanoink.net/divisions.html#NanoFabrication


• The Nano BioDiscovery Division provides instruments, assay kits, and contract services for nanoscale protein detection using Dip Pen Nanolithography® (DPN) technology. More

information is available at: http://nanoink.net/divisions.html#NanoBioDiscovery


• The NanoGuardian Division uses NanoEncryption™ technology to offer pharmaceutical

customers a state-of-the-art on-dose brand security solution to fight counterfeiting and illegal diversion. More information is available at: www.nanoguardian.net


• The NanoProfessor Division provides a complete nanotechnology educational solution including a suite of instruments, interdisciplinary-based curriculum, cutting-edge labs, and comprehensive educator and program support developed to extend hands-on nanotechnology education to the undergraduate classroom. More information is available at: www.nanoprofessor.net


• The NanoStem Cell Division aims to revolutionize the utility of stem cells through the application of DPN nanopatterning. More information is available at:

http://nanoink.net/divisions.html#NanoStemCell


About NanoInk

NanoInk, Inc. is an emerging growth technology company specializing in nanometer-scale

manufacturing and applications development for the life sciences, engineering, pharmaceutical, and education industries. Using Dip Pen Nanolithography® (DPN®), a patented and proprietary nanofabrication technology, scientists are enabled to rapidly and easily create micro-and nanoscale structures from a variety of materials on a range of substrates. This low cost, easy to use and scalable technique brings sophisticated nanofabrication to the laboratory desktop. Headquartered in the Illinois Science + Technology Park, north of Chicago, NanoInk currently has over 250 patents and applications filed worldwide and licensing agreements with Northwestern University, Stanford University, University of Strathclyde, University of Liverpool, California Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. For more information on products and services offered by NanoInk, Inc., visit www.nanoink.net 




New Guide:  What is nanotechnology?


Available to download now from NANO Magazine, this short guide to nanotechnology gives a basic introduction to nanotechnology and its applications, perfect for anyone who is a newcomer to the nanotech world to grasp the basics fast.


The guide looks at new applications of nanotechnology, nano for healthcare, nano for the environment, nanomaterials, nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, textiles, food and drink, the car industry and how nano can be applied to impart scents and flavours. It also asks the big question ”Are there risks?“.


Download at:  http://bit.ly/whatisnano 



Droid does more than just cellphones!

Previews of new Android pad computers on YouTube.  Most in the $100. range.  Plans revealed a marketing campaign for most of them in September.  Take a look - many comparison videos to guide you in purchasing.

These new computers connect to the Internet with WiFi and could be a reasonable investment for schools with reduced budgets for e-learning curriculum.  Watch the videos for more information.


15$ Android Slatecomputer- with screen add $50.!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGYHH16XTks&feature=player_embedded




NanoProfessorTM Nanoscience Education Program

Under way at Dakota County Technical College


Community College Students Begin Hands-On Learning

With State-of-the-Art Nanotechnology Equipment and Curriculum


SKOKIE, Ill. – February 9, 2010 – NanoProfessor, a division of NanoInk, Inc.®focused onnanotechnology education, is pleased to announce that its NanoProfessor Nanoscience Education Program iscurrently underway at Dakota County Technical College (DCTC), in Rosemount, Minn. Once completed, students enrolled in the DCTC program, will possess the knowledge and hands-on experience needed to pursue a career inthe high-tech world of nanotechnology. DCTC offers a 2-year AAS Degree in Nanoscience and was the first 2-year technical college to offer a multi-disciplinary nanoscience AAS degree. The NanoProfessor program will providein-depth experimental opportunities for students in the first semester of the program. Comparable hands-on nanotechnology education programs have traditionally only been available at large, prestigious 4-year universities with graduate programs.


”Nanotechnology is a growing aspect of virtually every industry in Minnesota, the U.S. and the world, and it will require a workforce that has a fundamental knowledge of nanotechnology and the hands-on skills to complete the nanotech-oriented jobs of today and the future. Exclusivity to an education in nanotechnology is not the answer,” said Deb Newberry, director of the Nanoscience Technology Program at DCTC. ”Together with NanoProfessor, Dakota County Technical College is helping meet this demand by creating opportunities for our students that previously they could only dream about.”


The NanoProfessor program is divided into units alternating between classroom lectures and hands-on lab work.Topics covered include Nanotechnology Basics, NanoPhysics, NanoChemistry, NanoBiology, EHS issues, and the evolution of nanotechnology. During the hands-on lab-work, DCTC students are learning the fundamentals for making custom-engineered, nanoscale structures that are used for applications in the areas of consumer packaging, forensics, medicine and biotechnology. Students are using nanotechnology fabrication techniques  such as Dip Pen Nanolithography®(DPN®) and working with state-of-the-art equipment including NanoInk’s NLP2000 Desktop NanoFabrication System, an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), an advanced Light Emitting Diode(LED) Fluorescence Microscope, and various nanoscale materials used today by nanotechnology experts

“I am excited to be part of the NanoProfessor Program at Dakota County Technical College, because the curriculum and lab-work are providing me with a great foundation to pursue a career in nanotechnology,” said Kelley McDonald, a student enrolled in DCTC’s AAS Degree program and participating in the NanoProfessor Nanoscience Education Pilot Program. “I’m also gaining valuable hands-on experience using the same equipment that many professionals are currently using, which will help make me more attractive to prospective employers.”


“In order for the United States to remain competitive in the global economy, we need to focus on innovations such as nanotechnology that will help create jobs,” said Dean Hart, executive vice president of NanoInk®. “Just as importantly, we need a workforce that will be able to fill these nanotech-focused jobs. Deb Newberry and DCTC are true pioneers in educating and preparing the masses to help secure our Nation’s leadership and competitiveness in the promising field of nanotechnology and NanoProfessor is honored to be a part of their exciting program.


”By 2015, the National Science Foundation has projected that the world will require a skilled workforce of more than two million nanotechnologists. The field of nanotechnology is already pioneering breakthroughs and innovations in the areas of energy, medicine and electronics, which will have a profound impact on lives in the 21st century.


For more information on how the NanoProfessor Nanoscience Education Program can be implemented at yourcommunity college, technical school, high school or university, please call (847) 679-NANO (6266) or visit www.NanoProfessor.net


About Dakota County Technical College (DCTC):

Dakota County Technical College is a public two-year institution of higher education dedicated to the philosophy that there is dignity in all work and value in individual growth and learning. It is the philosophy of the college that all of its students should have access to quality education that prepares them for rewarding careers. DCTC values its role in contributing to economic development by providing a knowledgeable and skilled workforce. The college views itself as a full partner in the higher education community and recognizes its contribution to lifelong learning. More information is available at http://www.dctc.mnscu.edu/index.cfm


About the NanoProfessor Nanoscience Education Program

The NanoProfessor Nanoscience Education Program aims to advance the field of nanoscience and address the growing need for a skilled workforce of nanotechnologists. The program utilizes NanoInk’s state-of-the-art NLP2000 Desktop Nanofabrication System to provide students an interdisciplinary-focused, hands-on approach to quickly and easily build custom-engineered, nanoscale structures in a classroom setting. The NanoProfessor Program, including equipment and an expert-driven curriculum, is available for community colleges, technical schools, high schools and universities nationwide. More information is available at www.NanoProfessor.net.




Wikipedia Co-Founder Designs Wiki-Style Directory of

Educational Videos for Children

Dr. Larry Sanger, co-founder of Wikipedia, has launched a new website designed to gather and organize educational videos for students ages 3 to 18. The site launched in October and currently features more than 11,000 videos across 2,000 categories on subjects such as math, science, and history. The nonprofit site features new software, specially developed for the site by Dr. Sanger, which allows wiki-style collaboration among users.


"Think of it as YouTube meets Wikipedia, filtering out everything but quality educational videos," says Dr. Sanger. "WatchKnow.org links together content from traditional sites, and also allows users of the site to improve the organization of the video categories, which makes finding the video you need much easier."


The site, which features videos from National Geographic, YouTube, and Google Videos, among others, took more than 18 months to develop and has been endorsed by educators from schools including Harvard, Stanford, Brigham Young, and more. WatchKnow.org is designed to complement and enhance the traditional learning experience for students as they study concepts that are traditionally hard to learn.


WatchKnow.org is funded by the Community Foundation of Northwest Mississippi (CFNM), which has set the goal of offering more than 50,000 videos on the site by the end of 2010. The site offers tips for video searching, separate pages for students, parents and teachers, and a guide for contributors.


http://www.watchknow.org/




HEXBUG Nano Swarms Toys“R”Us & RadioShack Stores Nationwide

October 20th, 2009

GREENVILLE, Texas - (Business Wire) Innovation First International, a global leader in educational and competitive robotics products and consumer robotics toys, today unveiled the HEXBUG Nano – a tiny, 1.75 inch energetic micro robotic bug that uses the physics of vibration and robotic intelligence to skitter along and explore its environment on smooth surfaces.


Planned as a series for collectors, the first release is the Nano Newton Collection of five unique bugs for kids 3 years old and up, and is now available for $7.99 each at Toys“R”Us stores nationwide and online at Toysrus.com, RadioShack and online at www.hexbug.com/nano. Additionally, Toys“R”Us is exclusively offering the HEXBUG Nano Habitat Set, which allows users to configure customizable mazes for the industrious creatures.


HEXBUG Nano fanatics interested in the lore of science and discovery can visit www.handandstars.com to earn points by answering science quiz questions, register their collection using the unique serial numbers included inside each test tube style package, and achieve global status and prestige in an online game that requires players to use scientific principles to build their own virtual Nano.


“HEXBUG Nano fascinates children and adults alike with its lifelike behavior while it exposes them to concepts such as cause-and-effect, momentum, center of gravity and randomness,” said Joel Carter, vice president, marketing, Innovation First International. “The Nano is also the first generation of HEXBUG Micro Robotic Creatures that is collectible and extends the user experience online with a world that reinforces the fun and fascination behind science and discovery through a variety of online challenges and game-play.”


Powered by a tiny motor and 12 fixed, angular legs, the industrious insect switches direction upon coming into contact with an object in its path, and possesses an uncanny sense of balance, flipping to its feet when turned on its back. Continuing to pay homage to its scientific heritage, the HEXBUG Nano family will include five unique collections, each named after an accomplished scientist. Each collection will include five distinct series, representing key scientific discoveries realized during the time period of its collection. For example, the Newton Collection, available today, includes Gravity, Orbit, Motion, Calculus and Refraction as its five series. Each Series includes five individual bugs, some of which are common while others are very rare, so collectors will need to be on the lookout for certain high point value creatures. There are also extremely rare bugs known as Mutations, which will appear from time to time. Additional collections and series will be unveiled in 2010.


HEXBUG Micro Robotic Creatures meet the most stringent safety regulations put into action by the new CPSIA law, designed with the underlying intention of protecting children and the environment from poisonous products.


About Innovation First International

Innovation First International, a privately held corporation, was founded on the belief that innovation very early in the design process is necessary to produce simple and elegant product designs. Innovation First began producing electronics for unmanned mobile ground robots, and is now an industry leader in the hobby, competition, education and toy markets. The company’s award winning Vex Robotics Design System, HEXBUG Micro Robotic Creatures and IFI Robotics span the education, consumer and business-to-business markets. In 2007, the company launched www.RobotEvents.com, an online portal dedicated to the advancement of educational and competitive robotics, which provides comprehensive information on the latest robotics competitions, educational workshops and information for teachers and mentors. The company also created the VEX Robotics Competition in 2007, designed to give a diverse group of students the chance to celebrate their accomplishments and share their passion for robotics with each other. Leveraging the company’s core competency in electrical and mechanical engineering, the RackSolutions division works closely with all major computer OEMs to provide custom mounting solutions and industry-wide rack compatibility for data installations of all sizes. In 2009 the company added offices in Hong Kong and the United Kingdom to better serve the global marketplace. With an advanced in-house metal fabrication plant, distribution center, and corporate office located together in a 13 acre complex in Greenville, Texas, the company is poised to continue on a rapid growth path. Please visit www.innovationfirst.com for additional information.

Source:

http://www.hexbug.com/news/




Meet our New Member for Math Curriculum Development


Kelly Liakos, BS, MA Applied Mathematics,University of Florida. Curriculum Development


I started teaching Calculus as a Graduate Assistant at the University of Florida in 1983. I then taught for a year in Cameroon West Africa at the Centre  Universite' de Dshang in Dschang Cameroon.  I returned to the University Of Florida and completed my Masters Degree in 1990


In 1991 I began teaching at Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville Florida and continued there until the summer of 2008.  In 1996 the Math Department decided to add a technology component to its curriculum which is the point at which I began developing computer animations and computer labs for my courses.


Basically my idea is that when you combine the theory and technology you have Calculus at its most powerful.


The reason I decided to stop teaching at this time was so that I could concentrate on developing animations and the corresponding notes. My web sites contains my ideas on my various courses but I would also be interested in developing animations to supplement other professor's ideas as well.  Contact Kelly at: Kalkulus7@aol.com


Over the past 12 years I have developed computer animations, labs, and graphics for use in my classes that cover course from PreCalculus and Trig through the Calculus sequence and elementary differential equations.


I have recently published my work on my personal web site http://calculus7.com/ and the link will now be provided through the group on the K-12 Education Outreach page.



California

University of California-Berkeley


'Understanding Science' has been endorsed by the California Science Teacher's Association and the American Institute of Biological Sciences, and will be part of the next edition of a popular high school biology textbook, "Biology" (Prentice Hall), by Ken Miller and Joe Levine.


The Web site premiered on Jan. 5 during the launch of Year of Science 2009, and received rave reviews from New York Times science writer Carl Zimmer, who referred to it in his blog as "a guided tour through the basic questions of what science is and how it works." He particularly praised the Process of Science flowchart illustrating how science works. A set of four interlocking circles represent the interplay between hypothesis testing and the ways scientists generate these hypotheses, while multiple arrows connect the circles to illustrate the roundabout way scientists make their discoveries.


"At best, I think, stories about science can only be snapshots of small patches of science's cycles within cycles," Zimmer wrote of the flowchart. "It (story telling) uses the one-dimensional medium of language to gesture towards science's mind-boggling multidimensionality. This picture from Understanding Science will help me remember to make that gesture, long after the Year of Science is over."


On the web: "Understanding Science" -- http://undsci.berkeley.edu/



Australia

New Australian Teaching Resource

AccessNano was a natural progression from the award-winning Australian nanotechnology teaching resource SHINE, which was created by science teachers at St Helena Secondary College in Melbourne, Australia.


AccessNano (www.accessnano.org) was launched in November 2008 - please do have a read of our website, and explore the teaching modules, with accompanying user guides, experiments, activities and animations.




Global

'Exploring Nano-Biotechnology'


Nanotechnology has undoubtedly become more and more popular among researchers from all fields of science. Special attention is given to implications of nanotechnology in various sub-domains of life sciences such as medicine, biology and fluidics. 

"Exploring Nanobiotechnology", the 4th volume of the Nanopolis multimedia encyclopedic series, sheds light onto the nano facets of life and illustrates some of the applications of nanotechnology in the fields of clinical diagnosis and medicine. A first edition of the project is in final development phase and will be released in early 2009. Currently the product is available for pre-release purchase at the Nanopolis order page.

   

Consisting of 300 multimedia animations, "Exploring Nano-Biotechnology" will be distributed as an offline multimedia resource on CD-ROM support as well as an online multimedia resource through the Nanopolis Online Multimedia Library.

 

Also receive TNTG 10% discount by ordering at this link:

http://www.nanopolis.net/order/order_form.php?code=S-UKE101LSTNTG



Global

Free textbook for one of most-taught community college courses


Rice's Connexions publishes introductory statistics book online


HOUSTON -- Aug 13, 2008 -- Rice University's Connexions, one of the most-visited online sites for open-educational resources, today announced it is making a popular textbook available free this fall for one of the country's most-attended transfer-level community college courses -- elementary statistics. The book, "Collaborative Statistics," has been used for more than a decade in California community college courses accepted for transfer credit by one of the nation's premier public university systems, the University of California. The online version of the book has already been chosen as the primary text for fall classes enrolling more than 700 students.


"'Collaborative Statistics' helps reduce the cost of education for students while providing them with the highest-quality educational content," said Connexions' Executive Director Joel Thierstein. "The release of the book in Connexions makes it possible for students all over the world to study this subject for free."


Rice acquired the rights to the book through the generosity of the Maxfield Foundation, which was founded by Rice alumnus and trustee Robert Maxfield to support scientific research and education.


More than 90,000 U.S. students take a statistics course at a community college each year and many pay $100 or more for a traditional statistics textbook. According to the nonprofit MakeTextbooksAffordable.org, the average U.S. college student spends about $900 per year on textbooks, and textbook prices are increasing faster than inflation. The problem has attracted increasing attention from policymakers since the U.S. Government Accountability Office reported on it in 2005, and legislation aimed at curbing textbook costs has been introduced in at least nine states and the U.S. House.


"Collaborative Statistics" is already available online at http://cnx.org/content/col10522. One of the book's co-authors, Barbara Illowsky, professor of mathematics and statistics at De Anza College in Cupertino, Calif., said about a dozen instructors at community college campuses in California have already selected the book for their courses this fall.


Illowsky and her co-author, recently retired De Anza mathematics professor Susan Dean, had noticed that more and more students were struggling to pay for textbooks, and sometimes dropped out because they could not afford books. The two were drawn to the idea of making "Collaborative Statistics" freely available online as an open textbook, both to cut college costs for students and provide more instructional options for teachers.


"Open textbooks reduce the cost of education so students can stay in school," Illowsky said. "They also allow faculty to customize text to address the needs of their students. It's a win-win situation."


Connexions worked closely with the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) in publishing the online version of "Collaborative Statistics." The CCCOER was established by California’s Foothill-De Anza Community College District and is made up of more than 70 community colleges in California, Iowa, Maryland, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Washington and Ontario, Canada.


"In Connexions, the content is completely adaptable and thus can meet the needs of the particular state or instructor," Thierstein said. "In Connexions, instructors, schools and/or states can rearrange the lessons, reorder the chapters, add their own materials and modify lessons, and thus every instructor at every school in every state can have their own version of this book."


The book is available online for free. Students can print their own PDF versions of all or parts of the book from their own printers. If they prefer to have a bound copy, they can order one online through Connexions and have it shipped to their home or office. Bound copies cost just $31.95. The printed books are produced by Mill Valley, Calif.-based print-on-demand vendor QOOP Inc., which signed a print agreement with Connexions in 2006.


Lesson plans and videotaped lectures that comprise Illowsky’s statistics course, as well as suggested homework, quizzes and exams, will also be available for free online in Connexions in the months to come.


"There is a tremendous need for high-quality open textbooks created specifically for use in community colleges," said Martha Kanter, chancellor of the Foothill-De Anza Community College District, which is leading a feasibility study of different textbook models through the Community College Open Textbook Project. "The tools to publish free books and courses are available, and obtaining the rights to existing texts, as Rice and Connexions have done, is one way to quickly make more textbooks for high-demand courses available for free."


About Connexions

Founded in 1999 as one of the first online open-educational resources (OER), Connexions has long pioneered digital education. Connexions is a platform and repository for OER that lets people create, share, modify and vet open educational materials that are accessible to anyone, anywhere, anytime for free via the Web. Connexions' modular interactive information is in use by universities, community colleges, primary and secondary schools and lifelong learners worldwide. The number of people using Connexions has grown by 40 percent over the past year. With peak traffic of up to 850,000 visitors per month, it is one of the world's most popular OER sites.


UK

People in Nano

The Age of Nanotechnology

Professor James Gimzewski

Presentation from London, UK

1 hour 30 minutes

08-Jul-2008  Electronics channel


About the presentation

James Gimzewski talks about the strongest material ever made, the reality of a space elevator, how the electronics industry kick-started the nanomedicine revolution and the potential for programming single molecules. If that's not enough diversity in one individual, he also shares some of his passion for the artistic interpretation of the nano world.


About the speaker

Jim Gimzewski is a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles and Director of the Nano & Pico Characterization Core Facility of the California NanoSystems Institute and the Scientific Director of the Art|Sci Center. Prior to joining the UCLA faculty, he was a group leader at IBM Zurich Research Laboratory, where he research in nanoscale science and technology for more than 18 years. Dr. Gimzewski pioneered research on mechanical and electrical contacts with single atoms and molecules using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and was one of the first persons to image molecules with STM. His accomplishments include the first STM-based fabrication of molecular suprastructures at room temperature using mechanical forces to push molecules across surfaces, the discovery of single molecule rotors and the development of new micromechanical sensors based on nanotechnology, which explore ultimate limits of sensitivity and measurement. This approach was recently used to convert biochemical recognition into Nanomechanics. His current interests are in the nanomechanics of cells and bacteria where he collaborates with the UCLA Medical and Dental Schools. He is involved in projects that range from the operation of X-rays, ions and nuclear fusion using pyroelectric crystals, direct deposition of carbon nanotubes and single molecule DNA profiling. Dr. Gimzewski is also involved in numerous art-science collaborative projects that have been exhibited in museums throughout the world.


The Age of Nanotechnology

Professor James Gimzewski

Presentation from London, UK

2008-07-08 12:00:00.0 Electronics Channel

>> go to webcast



Germany


NanoReisen- Nano Journey, Adventures beyond the decimal

Takes you on an interactive video trip from the world of matter to the nano-cosmos

http://www.nanoreisen.com/english/index.html



Nano Textbook:

Nanotechnology: Understanding Small Systems

Ben Rogers    University of Nevada, Reno, USA

Sumita Pennathur    University of California, Santa Barbara, USA

Jesse Adams    Nevada Nanotech Systems, Inc., Nevada, USA

Series: Mechanical Engineering Series  Volume: 29 


  List Price: $89.95

Cat. #: 8207

ISBN: 9780849382079

ISBN 10: 0849382076

Publication Date: 11/29/2007

Number of Pages: 416

Availability: In Stock

   CRC Press 

http://www.crcpress.com/shopping_cart/products/product_detail.asp?sku=8207&isbn=9780849382079&parent_id=&pc=


Provides an accessible introduction without sacrificing rigorous scientific details

Covers the seven main facets of nanotechnology: nanomaterials, nanomechanics, nanoelectronics, nanoscale heat transfer, nanophotonics, nanoscale fluid mechanics, and nanobiotechnology

Introduces the historical figures who founded, sculpted, and defined the field as it exists today

Supports the discussion with homework problems, applications, examples, and discussion questions

Compares macroscale systems to those at the nanoscale, showing how scale phenomena affect behavior Solutions

Manual available with qualifying course adoptions!


Although nanotechnology is a hot topic, the search for a true introductory textbook usually comes up cold. Students in a first course on nanotechnology come from a wide variety of backgrounds, so the text must not assume understanding of too much background material, nor be too focused on any particular area. And still, those students are capable of understanding the hard details of the science, so the text must not gloss over the rigorous scientific explanations. Nanotechnology: Understanding Small Systems fits perfectly between popular science books and high-level treatises, neither of which suit the needs of students approaching this field for the first time.

Working from the ground up, this text provides a detailed yet accessible introduction to the world’s fastest growing field. Through real-world examples, hundreds of homework problems, original illustrations, and a clear approach, the authors accomplish the delicate task of keeping the book engaging while not avoiding real explanations of complex concepts. They take a systems-based approach, demonstrating how an understanding of the various areas underlying nanotechnology come together to create systems with unique functions and characteristics. In every case, comparing nanoscale systems to macroscale systems reveals the complex and fundamental differences between phenomena at different scales and uncovers the specific challenges posed by nanotechnology.


With comprehensive coverage conveyed in an engaging and entertaining style, Nanotechnology: Understanding Small Systems provides a gateway into the exciting and rapidly evolving area of nanotechnology.



Virgina


"The "UVA Virtual Lab" is an NSF sponsored science education website bringing microelectronics, nanotechnology, and the underlying science to college and pre-college students, as well as members of the general public.  It replaces math and jargon with intuitive 3D animations.  Microelectronics presentations explain how semiconductors and transistors work, and how they are fabricated in both university labs and billion dollar factories.  Nanoscience presentations describe alternate forms of nanocarbon, the process of DNA self-assembly, and the inner workings of instruments used to see at the nanoscale (such as SEMs, AFMs and STMs).  These pages link back to basic science presentations on electricity, magnetism and electrical circuits, including "X-ray vision" simulations of common classroom experiments and apparatus. Overall, the website contains over fifty presentations on micro and nanoscience, each illustrated with dozens of virtual reality animations."


UVA Virtual Lab Website: www.virlab.virginia.edu


"Hands-on to Introduction to Nanoscience" Class website

"Under NSF sponsorship, this class was developed to introduce early undergraduates to nanoscience and nanotechnology:  The theme? In nanoscience, Newton’s sensible laws are replaced by the weirdness of quantum mechanics.  The consequences? First, electrons begin to act like waves - but because all waves are similar, experiments with light and water waves offer insights into electron behavior.  Second, at the nanoscale one can no longer use light-image-based microfabrication to make things directly.  Instead one has to design the parts so they know how we want them to finally come together (the ultimate example of this self-assembly? DNA synthesis of protein).  And finally, to confirm that things worked the way we planned, we need new instrumentation to see things at the nanoscale (such as scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopes). The class website provides a full set of PowerPoint lecture notes covering these topics (including figures, animations, readings and lists of demonstration equipment).  It also includes full guides to student laboratory use of miniaturized STMs and AFMs. Both lectures and labs make use of 3D animations provided by the sister "UVA Virtual Lab" website focusing on microelectronics, nanotechnology, and their underlying science."


"Hands-on Introduction to Nanoscience" Class Website: http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/Nanoscience_class/Nanoscience_class.htm


As a part of their "UVA Virtual Lab" and "Hands-on Nanoscience" curriculum development efforts, University of Virginia faculty are working with state public school teachers to develop K-12 nanoscience teaching resources.  This includes an ongoing effort to identify materials already posted on, or available through, the World Wide Web.  Their growing list, complete with descriptions and categorized by the type of teaching material,  can be viewed at:

http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/Nanoscience_class/Nanoscience_K12_teaching_resources.htm


Virtal Lab tools/experiments for teachers/students


http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/VL/easyScan_STM.htm


http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/VL/easyScan_AFM.htm


http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/VL/SEM.htm


http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/VL/SPM_operation.htm


http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/VL/SPM_piezoelectric.htm


http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/VL/Nanocarbon.htm


http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/VL/DNA_close_up.htm


http://www.virlab.virginia.edu/VL/Semiconductor_crystals.htm




MEMS & Nanotechnology for Kids Wins 2008 IPPY Book Award


Proving that "small is cool," book that aims to inspire kids about the possibilities of next-generation science and engineering is honored by Independent Publisher for best Juvenile/Young Adult Non-Fiction.


Scottsdale, AZ (PRWEB) June 4, 2008 -- MEMS & Nanotechnology for Kids, written by Marlene Bourne and published by Scottsdale-based Bourne Research LLC, is a bronze medal recipient of the 12th Annual Independent Publisher (IPPY) Book Award in the Juvenile/Young Adult Non-Fiction category. Honoring the best independently published books of the past year, more than 3,100 entries came from 16 countries around the world; winners included works from renowned publishers such as Afton Historical Society Press, Harvard University Press and Yale University Press.


"What (the book) does is encourage a student's natural sense of wonder by taking a close look at some of the things in his or her life that might normally receive little more than a passing thought," writes the Virginia Journal of Science Education. "The detailed and colorful images are powerful."


MEMS & Nanotechnology for Kids provides a basic introduction to today's coolest technologies. It explores what we can find at the micro- and nano-scale, and then takes a look at various MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) devices and nanomaterials; readers learn how they work and why they're useful in all kinds of products. Although written for students ages 11-14 to inspire interest in science and engineering, younger children and adults may also benefit from the easy-to-read explanations.


Printed by Sentinel Printing Company of St. Cloud, Minnesota, MEMS & Nanotechnology for Kids also recently won Gold in the Central Minnesota Printing Professionals 2008 Galley of Superb Printing, a prestigious honor among printers.


MEMS & Nanotechnology for Kids (ISBN: 9780979550560; Price: $24.95) is available online at Amazon.com; signed copies of the book can be purchased at www.bourneresearch.com. Bulk discounts are available; please contact Bourne Research at 480-695-0521 for details.



About Bourne Research


Bourne Research LLC is a trusted source of business and market intelligence for global leaders seeking strategic information on emerging technology trends and their business impact. Its founder, Marlene Bourne, is a highly respected industry analyst with nearly 15 years of experience following the development of emerging technologies, and is internationally recognized as one of the leading experts on MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) and its convergence with nanotechnology. For more information, visit www.bourneresearch.com.




Future tech project can help teachers  introduce nanotechnology capabilities to their students


Nokia Morph Concept Video


Morph is a concept demonstrating some of the possibilities nanotechnologies might enable in future communication devices. Morph can sense its environment, is energy harvesting, and self cleaning. Morph is a flexible two-piece device that can adapt its shape to different use modes. Nanotechnology enables us to have adaptive materials yet rigid forms on demand.


It is also featured in the MoMA online exhibition "Design and the Elastic Mind". It has been a collaboration project of the Nokia Research Center and Cambridge Nanoscience Center.





Team-based e-learning turns a new page 


How do students, who may be located across the globe, collaborate together on team-based project work? European researchers have developed the first online platform that integrates elements of e-learning, social networking and project management to help virtual teams get the most from their practical experience. How do you like to learn? Do you listen to a lecture and take notes, or would you prefer visual diagrams, pictures and handouts? 


Whatever your favoured learning style, the listening and watching eventually comes to an end and it is time to “do”. Project work is one of the best ways to help people put theory into practice, to reinforce and apply new concepts or skills. People also benefit from working in a team, discovering the dynamics of collaboration and teamwork.


“Increasingly, project-centred teaching approaches are being adopted by institutions and enterprises”, says Xuan Zhou, a researcher at the Germany L3S Research Centre. “Teams, rather than individual students, will work on a given project and where support from teachers will often be substituted by interaction among team members (students). These team members may come from different institutions to provide different competencies and approaches.”


Numerous web-based packages are available that allow people to collaborate on and manage projects among remote teams. But these tend to be geared towards commercial project management and are not focused on project work as a learning process, per se.


The COOPER project has built a platform that meets the growing need for project-based e-learning. The platform combines functionality from project management, social networking methods and traditional e-learning systems. It provides a virtual environment in which geographically dispersed teams can talk together, contact tutors, set up project workflows and submit documents. It is especially for the university sector and companies with an international workforce or that have to train foreign customers.


“Most e-learning systems are based on modules, students work through a curriculum,” explains Zhou, a member of the COOPER consortium. “Usually a student has something to learn, and the tutor sets questions or an assignment to test what they have learned. Collaborative learning through teamwork projects need an entire project management system, but with e-learning functionality built in.”


Flexible workflows


The COOPER project realised that its project management tools had to be extremely flexible. “If team members were sitting together round a table they would have to agree on how to work best together,” says Zhou. “Would an individual take overall charge? Who would sign off on which documents, call meetings, or set deadlines? COOPER lets project teams set all these parameters and workflows. The participants’ roles and needs during the project’s life can vary; teams must manage change without requiring the intervention of administrators. The technology lets them easily make these changes.


This flexibility is possible because the COOPER platform uses a technique called Dynamic Process. By integrating Dynamic Process and WebML, a modelling language for web application, it allows the project team to effectively build its own, customised project management system and workflows.


Another important innovation is the integration of several communications systems, including voice over IP (VoIP) and video conferencing. Team members can speak with one another, hold virtual meetings, or leave messages for other team members or tutors.


One of the problems with project-based learning is that its impact is hard to assess. Another arm of the COOPER project has looked at various assessment strategies. The research partners realised that standard question/answer assessments were less suitable. Instead, they are developing tools that follow a system from the Open University of the Netherlands and the Central Institute for Test Development (CITO), which includes long-term assessment schemes.


What's the point?


Sometimes students find teamwork projects vacuous, especially when they know that the final output is deemed less important than the production process. But COOPER gives added value to project results. All the output from projects is analysed and archived to build up a “project memory bank”. This “collective memory” can be used to enhance study programmes and for institutions to provide public information about their curricula and innovative projects.


Three end-user partners are currently testing the COOPER platform. The ALaRI master programme, part of the University of Lugano, and the Alta Scuola Politecnica in Milan are both using COOPER to organise teams of remote students working on real-life problems set by sponsors and external organisations. CoWare, an embedded chip manufacturer, has offices around the globe, and is using the COOPER platform to improve its technical training programmes. Teams of company employees, vendors and engineers in customer companies work through case studies and real-life problems to find solutions and build prototype products.


The project is due to end in March 2008 and the majority of the COOPER platform will be freely downloadable over the web, except some commercial components, such as the visual design tool WebRatio and VoIP, which can be requested under academic license agreement. Project partners will provide consultative services.


Source: ICT Results 




News from Nobelprize.org on new educational game


February 22, 2008


From the first X-ray images that allowed us to look inside our bodies to unravelling the complex machinery that lies at the heart of heredity, the Nobel Prizes have recognized many of the major achievements in scientific and medical imaging. Revisiting any of these individual Prizes provides an informative snapshot of the state-of-the-art thinking in imaging at the time of the award. However, an all-together more instructive and revealing vision of how imaging has advanced over the decades can be provided by tracing the development of the field along the path from one Nobel Prize to another.


With this in mind, we have created a new production entitled Imaging Life that combines articles, images and video to reveal the stories behind the advancement of scientific and medical imaging through the Nobel Prizes - some of which you will find listed below. Navigating the timeline allows you to trace the individual paths of illumination that led to each milestone in imaging and see how related Nobel Prizes have changed our view of ourselves and the world around us.


If this leaves you with an appetite to discover more about imaging, you will find plenty more relevant articles, videos and games on Nobelprize.org, examples of which can also be found below. As always, please let us know your opinion of what you find on Imaging Life and Nobelprize.org, or any suggestions for how we might improve the site.


Adam Smith

Editor-in-Chief


IMAGING LIFE


From atoms to X-rays and from magnetism to microscopes, take a trip along the timeline to see how Nobel Prize-awarded breakthroughs in imaging have changed how we view the world around and within us.


Visit Imaging Life  


http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/physics/imaginglife/  




Scientists Scan Striking Nanoscale Images

By Emmet Cole    

02.15.08 | 12:00 AM


Above: This image captured in German labs by Thorsten Dziomba, shows GeSi quantum dots -- a mere 15 nanometers high and 70 nanometers in diameter. Credit: Thorsten Dziomba/Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and SPMage07


For the first time, late last year, a team of British scientists filmed the nanoscale interaction of an attacking virus with an enzyme and a DNA strand in real time.


This was the latest breakthrough in the advancement of scanning probe microscopes -- the family of nonoptical microscopes researchers use to create striking images through raster scans of individual atoms.


The granddaddy of them all is the scanning tunneling microscope, a 1986 invention that won its creators the Nobel Prize. STMs pass an electrical probe over a substance, allowing scientists to visualize regions of high electron density and infer the position of individual atoms and molecules.


To mark the 25th anniversary of the development of STMs, an international contest -- SPMage07 -- showcasing the best STM images was founded

View the gallery at:

http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/multimedia/2008/02/nano_gallery_jmm?slide=1&slideView=6




Affiliate Sponsor - Optical Tools for Educators


Click on Logo to view the Marketing Video

To request more infomation  


How researchers are using CytoViva

Since its market introduction in 2004, CytoViva microscope systems have been adopted by a diverse group of researchers in university, industry and government laboratories. These researchers utilize CytoViva’s real-time, high resolution imaging capability to support a wide range of applications.


A recurring theme of these research efforts is the need to observe and analyze nano-scale materials, bacteria or even viruses; often interacting with live cells, tissue or other materials. Many times this analysis requires the ability to visualize both fluorescent and non-fluorescent sample portions simultaneously and in real time.


CytoViva is capturing the attention of researchers around the globe. Imagine what CytoViva will capture for you.


Co-developed by Auburn University and Aetos Technologies, Inc., CytoViva™ is an advanced optical microscopy system with a novel fluorescence imaging capability. The product is a 2007 and 2006 recipient of the prestigious R&D 100 award, which is granted annually to the market’s most innovative new technologies. Cytoviva also received a 2007 Nano50TM award, for its contribution to the fast growing world of nanotechnology research.   


At the heart of the CytoViva system is a technological advancement that provides a solution to limitations faced by researchers across many sectors. Now scientists are able to view both fluorescent and non-fluorescent sample structure simultaneously, in real time, at sub 100-nanometer resolution. To date, the system is used most by researchers involved in infectious disease, nanotechnology and drug delivery.


Sample Videos for Educators

CytoViva has agreed to provide their gallery of video images for our University and K-12 educators.  We are pleased to partner with this excellent company to bring quality nanoscale images into the classrooms of the future as an important resource.  Not to be used for Commercial publishing. 


View the Gallery Videos at

http://www.nanonews.tv/documents/50.html


CytoViva, Inc. is a subsidiary of Aetos Technologies, Inc. (www.aetostech.com) a privately held technology development company founded to bridge the gap between university-based research and the commercial market. The company actively seeks to participate in co-development projects with other private companies, research institutions and universities to commercialize additional technologies. Aetos, an equity partner with Auburn University, currently has three affiliated companies, Eagle Aquaculture, Inc., Falcon Protein Products, Inc. and CytoViva, Inc.


Watch the Dual Mode Flourescense Video

http://www.cytoviva.com/product_dual_mode_fluorescence.htm 


Mention NanoNEWS.TV and/or The NanoTechnology Group Inc and upon Completion of Purchase we will send you an Educator's Appreciation Check as a gift for supporting our Sponsor.

 



NSF Announces new sites for nano science education

NSF Centers Launch Two Websites for Students, Teachers and You
 

New resource-rich websites have been launched by two centers funded by the National Science Foundation, the Nanoscale Informal Science Education (NISE) Network and the National Center for Learning and Teaching in Nanoscale Science and Engineering.
 

The NISE Network's Resource Center provides access to a vast collection of educational resources, and visitors to the site can join in this creative community effort. For teachers, students, or anyone interested in nanoscience and the many potential nanotechnology applications, the web site's content includes study materials, academic approaches, collections of graphics, a newsletter, links to other institutions working in the field, and much more.

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/nise-resources/index.php


The NanoEd Resource Portal created by the National Center for Learning and Teaching in Nanoscale Science and Engineering (NCLT), is designed to both gather and disseminate information on nano-education related research, nanconcepts, teaching materials, seminars, lectures, degree programs, and more. The purpose of this portal is to provide a “one-click-resource” site for the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Education (NSEE) community, and to inform and educate the next generation of nanoresearchers and teachers. 49 lessons posted for grades 7-12.


http://www.nanoed.org/


Also check our K-12 Education Outreach and Global Outreach pages




New Resource from North Carolina State University for Grades 5-12

NanoScale Science: Exploring the World at the Smallest of Scales 

M Gail Jones

Michael R Falvo

Amy R Taylor

Bethany P Broadwell


Grades: 5 - 12

Stock Number: PB210X

 

Member Price: $19.96

Non-Member Price: $24.95


http://www.nsta.org/store/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/9781933531052



 

Nanoscience’s Top Publisher, Online Tools Website Enter Partnership
 

Taylor & Francis Group LLC and Network for Computational Nanotechnology Sign MOU To Expand Online Content, Services for Nanoscience Researchers


Boca Raton, Fla.; and West Lafayette, Ind.  --  Two of nanotechnology’s top content leaders, Taylor & Francis Group LLC and the Network for Computational Nanotechnology led by Purdue University, today announced an agreement to jointly explore and develop a set of new online content and collaboration offerings to aid the global nanoscience research community.
 

In a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), officials from Taylor & Francis Group LLC and the Network for Computational Nanotechnology agreed to cooperate to increase availability, volume, and appeal of online content for nanoscience.  The two parties also agreed to explore new ways to make it easier for scientists, researchers and students to create and share content with colleagues.   
 

The Network for Computation Nanotechnology’s nanoHUB (www.nanoHUB.org) is a rich, web-based resource funded by the National Science Foundation to promote research, education, and collaboration in nanotechnology. With over 25,000 users and operated by Purdue University, nanoHUB currently hosts close to 800 nanoscience resources, including a breakthrough suite of online simulation tools, along with online presentations, courses, learning modules and podcasts.
 

“nanoHUB was created to be a resource for research and education for the nanoscience community. It is a kind of social network connecting nanotechnology content developers with users.  We’re excited about partnering with Taylor & Francis Group and NanoScienceWorks.org, as together they bring an exhaustive list of noted expert authors and new possibilities for online content and community to the web,”  said Mark Lundstrom, Director, Network for Computation Nanotechnology.
 

Taylor & Francis Group LLC is the publisher of more than 80 nanotechnology textbooks, reference books and journals, representing more than 1,000 nanoscience research authors and editors.  Among Taylor & Francis’ titles are the best-selling Handbook of Nanoscience, Engineering, and Technology, 2nd Edition and the Dekker Encyclopedia of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. Taylor & Francis Group is also the underwriter of NanoScienceWorks.org, (www.nanoscienceworks.org) a content and community portal for nano researchers with a worldwide directory of more than 1,100 nanoscience researchers and 450 institutions within some 20 different nanotechnology disciplines.


“Taylor & Francis Group is committed to being the leading publisher in cutting-edge fields of science, such as nanotechnology and clean technology.  Last year, we launched NanoScienceWorks.org as our first step to provide a paramount venue for content and collaboration to hundreds of thousands of nanoresearchers and students.  Today, I’m thrilled to take our next step forward with nanoHUB, the premiere provider of online simulation tools for nanotechnology,” said Emmett Dages, President, Taylor & Francis Group LLC.
 

Under the MOU, the partnership between Taylor & Francis Group and Purdue University is effective immediately.
 

About Taylor & Francis Group LLC

Internationally known publisher Taylor & Francis Group LLC has emerged as the leading Nanotechnology publisher, boasting over 80 nanotechnology books, including the Handbook of Nanoscience, Engineering, and Technology, 2nd Edition; the upcoming textbook Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology; eight nanotechnology-based journals; online access to the premier nanotechnology library NANOnetBASE (www.nanonetbase.com); and the all-encompassing Dekker Encyclopedia of Nanoscience.  The firm’s new community-based nanotechnology web portal NanoScienceWorks.org (www.nanoscienceworks.org) includes spotlights on researchers, institutions, articles, and multimedia outlets for all things nano.

 

The Network for Computational Nanotechnology

The Network for Computational Nanotechnology has a mission to connect theory, experiment, and computation in a way that makes a difference to the future of nanotechnology. NCN’s online collaborative portal, www.nanoHUB.org, provides  state-of-the-art algorithms, approaches, and software simulation tools and more to thousands of nanotechnology researchers worldwide. The NCN was recently awarded a 5-year $18.25 million grant from the National Science Foundation to support the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative with expanded capabilities and services for computer simulations. The NCN is lead by Purdue University and includes teams at the University of  Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Norfolk State University, Northwestern University, University of California at Berkeley, the Department of Energy’s Molecular Foundry, and the University of Texas at El Paso.


Contacts:

Nora Konopka

Publisher, Engineering and Environmental Sciences

Taylor and Francis Group LLC - CRC Press

6000 Broken Sound Parkway N.W. Suite 300

Boca Raton, FL  33487

Phone: 561-998-2531

Nora.Konopka@taylorandfrancis.com

www.nanoscienceworks.org 

 

George B. Adams III, Ph.D.

Associate Director for Programs

Network for Computational Nanotechnology

the home of  nanoHUB.org

Purdue University

1205 West State Street

West Lafayette, IN 47907-2057

Phone: 765.494.2698